Browsing Tag

injury prevention

General Fitness and Well–Being

The Importance of Stretching Correctly

January 22, 2018
the importance of stretching correctly

Most of us stretch when we wake up in the morning or when we feel stiffness in certain areas. However, we should make stretching a part of our daily routine.

Whether you’re an office worker, runner, or fitness enthusiast, here are a few reasons on why you should be stretching correctly.


the importance of stretching correctly

To Improve True Flexibility

Forced stretching leads to opposite effects of stretching. If you’re just beginning (or just really tight) and find the muscle(s) not wanting to release, first relax into it instead of forcing the stretch. Only go as far as you can.
Relax and release a little at a time with every exhale (passive stretching). This way you’ll work with you true stretch and see more of an improvement in your flexibility. In fact, there are many types of stretching, choose the one that will work for you.

To Avoid Overstretching

Reduce the chance of injury from overstretching. The main reason to stretch is not only lengthen the muscle but to create more space in your joints and ligaments so there is less impact and so the bones can rotate properly to maintain appropriate range of motion.
Take one day at a time, and be careful not to go beyond your limit. Each day will be different. Know the difference between when you’re pushing yourself safely and when you’re over doing it.

the importance of stretching correctly the movement blog kindall payne

To Release Deep Muscle Connections

When stretching is done correctly and frequently enough, those aches and pains in deeper muscular areas can finally begin to release. Why? This is because deep muscle connections are all intertwined with each other. The psoas muscle, which connects to the lower back and top of the hamstring) is fantastic example of why the body needs to move and stretch as an entire system.

To Stretch Right for Your Body Type

Every type of body is unique and every type of body will need slightly different stretching techniques. Pay attention to your range of motion each day and where soreness and tightness may lie. Being aware about what your body needs each day will set how you perform, exercise, cool down, and stretch. Listen to your body and stretch mindfully.

Want more tips? Read this:

Tips for Working at Home

Ways to Release Tension

Dance Data Health Insights

2018 Movement Census – Dance needs YOU!

January 8, 2018
the movement blog survey 2018 dancers worldwide

Calling All Dancers!

We have an ambitious goal to conduct the first global survey of dancers to provide the community with insights on performance & injury prevention.

As we kick off a new year we’re excited at The Movement Blog for what 2018 can bring. This year we are aiming big by attempting to gain never before collated insights about the world of dance. To do this we need your help. In return for a few minutes of your time you will have the chance to win an amazing health tracker, the Fitbit Charge 2!

the movement blog survey 2018 dancers worldwide

As you probably know, Kindall studied Dance Science at Trinity Laban in London. It’s a practice that I find fascinating and important for the dance world. Dance Science looks to apply the principles and techniques normally reserved for elite athletes, to optimise performance and prevent injury.
This is a crucial movement for the dance industry which traditionally hasn’t had the same levels of support as other physically intensive pursuits. However, something that has surprised me as I’ve learned more about Dance Science is just how little data there is available about the industry.
Dance Science needs data to be successful but most data sets are collected by private organisations or within academia. Indeed if you search Google for ‘dance data’ the top result is a database for Scottish Country Dance (bravo Scotland 🎉).
trinity laban dance science the movement blog survey 2018

Wayne McGregor’s Dancers working with Trinity Laban’s Dance Science Department

Knowing that The Movement Blog attracts users from all over the world it got us thinking – why don’t we conduct our own survey of the dance community to share with the dance community. We are very please to announce TMB’s first annual Movement Census!

OUR GOALS

  • To understand more about different aspects of the dance community across the world
  • Gain insight on how dancers deal with injury prevention and performance optimisation
  • To provide tips and advice on how to avoid injury and perform to your best
  • To understand dancer habits and behaviours whether they are teachers, pros or enthusiasts
  • To raise awareness about the importance of injury prevention
The survey itself only takes 5 minutes to complete and the results will be completely confidential. The more dancers from different backgrounds who complete the survey, the better the results will be.
In return for sharing the survey with your friends we will enter you in a competition to win a Fitbit Charge 2. Once we’ve compiled the results we will publish a report which will be free for all respondents to download.
the movement blog survey 2018 dancers worldwide

Photo by Drew Graham

Dance General Fitness and Well–Being Tips

A Journey Back to Dance #6: Dealing with Old and New Injuries

July 31, 2016
journey back to dance #6: old and new injuries

(Above: Teaching a GYROKINESIS® class via Video Chat to help dancer, Valeria Caboi, recover from an old hip injury.)

Often times dancers have to deal with either old and/or new injuries, especially when returning to training and performance.

Even when we train, retrain, and cross train to prevent and reduce injury old or even new injuries could flare up when the body is doing something . New injuries can be caused by overexertion, fatigue, or accidents like falling or tripping. So how should a dancer cope when getting back to dance, movement, and performance?

 Here’s some basic advice that every dancer should know and implement.

journey back to dance #6: old and new injuries

An example of Kinesis-Taping given by an Osteopath to ensure proper healing and support.

1) Deal with the injury.

  • Rest, ice, compress, and elevate (RICE) the injury area if needed. In addition, the UK’s NHS website notes ‘Protection’ as the first protocol (PRICE), which means to protect the injuries area from further harm.
  • Whether it’s a new or recurrent injury, book an appointment with an Osteopath, Physiotherapist, or with a  Doctor to ensure nothing is torn or fractured and to determine whether it is an acute or chronic injury.

2) Listen to your body.

  • Avoid ‘pushing through’ and continue resting and any recommended treatment, especially if the injured area is still sensitive.
  • Know your limits. Consider taking only the first half of a class to protect the injured area and to ensure the injured area has healed properly.
  • Don’t be ashamed to let teachers know. Although we aim to avoid injuries when at all possible, dealing with an injury properly is just as important.

3) Slowly get back in the game.

  • Focus on proper alignment, beginning and finishing movements correctly, and using true range of motion (i.e. turnout).
  • Know what areas to strengthen and stretch and continue recommended exercises given by therapist or doctor if necessary.
  • Stay aware of what may have initially caused the injury to help prevent and reduce re-injury.

journey back to dance #6: old and new injuries


Want to try something new to ease any pain or discomfort within your dancing?
Check out my GYROTONIC® Case Study Recruitment for discount sessions.

Healing Sources

Lazy Dancer Tips by Alessia Lugoboni

Technique Class Participation Options for Injured Dancers

RNOH NHS: Centre for Dance Medicine (UK)

Osteopathy & Massage Clinic (UK)

Harkness Centre for Dance Medicine (US)

Perspectives on Dance Injury