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Dance Data Health Insights

2018 Movement Census – Dance needs YOU!

January 8, 2018
the movement blog survey 2018 dancers worldwide

Calling All Dancers!

We have an ambitious goal to conduct the first global survey of dancers to provide the community with insights on performance & injury prevention.

As we kick off a new year we’re excited at The Movement Blog for what 2018 can bring. This year we are aiming big by attempting to gain never before collated insights about the world of dance. To do this we need your help. In return for a few minutes of your time you will have the chance to win an amazing health tracker, the Fitbit Charge 2!

the movement blog survey 2018 dancers worldwide

As you probably know, Kindall studied Dance Science at Trinity Laban in London. It’s a practice that I find fascinating and important for the dance world. Dance Science looks to apply the principles and techniques normally reserved for elite athletes, to optimise performance and prevent injury.
This is a crucial movement for the dance industry which traditionally hasn’t had the same levels of support as other physically intensive pursuits. However, something that has surprised me as I’ve learned more about Dance Science is just how little data there is available about the industry.
Dance Science needs data to be successful but most data sets are collected by private organisations or within academia. Indeed if you search Google for ‘dance data’ the top result is a database for Scottish Country Dance (bravo Scotland 🎉).
trinity laban dance science the movement blog survey 2018

Wayne McGregor’s Dancers working with Trinity Laban’s Dance Science Department

Knowing that The Movement Blog attracts users from all over the world it got us thinking – why don’t we conduct our own survey of the dance community to share with the dance community. We are very please to announce TMB’s first annual Movement Census!

OUR GOALS

  • To understand more about different aspects of the dance community across the world
  • Gain insight on how dancers deal with injury prevention and performance optimisation
  • To provide tips and advice on how to avoid injury and perform to your best
  • To understand dancer habits and behaviours whether they are teachers, pros or enthusiasts
  • To raise awareness about the importance of injury prevention
The survey itself only takes 5 minutes to complete and the results will be completely confidential. The more dancers from different backgrounds who complete the survey, the better the results will be.
In return for sharing the survey with your friends we will enter you in a competition to win a Fitbit Charge 2. Once we’ve compiled the results we will publish a report which will be free for all respondents to download.
the movement blog survey 2018 dancers worldwide

Photo by Drew Graham

Short Stories the Gyrotonic Method

Honest Oversights When Learning How to Teach the GYROTONIC® Method

October 20, 2017
7 mistakes that need attention when teaching the gyrotonic method

First of all, CONGRATULATIONS on your certification and welcome to the world of this unique movement method. For those learning to teach for the first time, especially the GYROTONIC® Method, you might feel like a fish out of water, and that’s normal! Whether you’re in your first week or first year here are some honest oversights that helped me to grow as a trainer. The aim to also guide new trainers to understand why it’s important to positively acknowledge oversights.

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.”
― Albert Einstein


1) Feeling Uncomfortable with New Clients

This can be tricky for new trainers. You’ve learned the sequences but now what do you do with someone not from your training course? Begin slowly but efficiently. The key to working with new clients is making sure that they feel the movements, especially when dealing with different bodies and abilities. Even if you only get to two sequences in the entire hour, that’s all right. 99.9% of the time you won’t teach a class in its full format, so don’t stress out.

2) Freezing in a ‘Creative Class’

Now it’s your time to show all of the work you’ve invested. Don’t shy away from going in different direction than planned. For example, your client(s) could come in with a new or particularly painful area. This calls for you to adhere their needs on the spot, of course. First, relax and gather your thoughts. How could they improve that area within the sequences? Is there anything new you could specifically introduce? Do what you know and work with them in this way, emphasizing key points.

3) Giving Uncertain Hands-On

Hands-On – this is the main name of the game when it comes to teaching the Gyrotonic Method. It’s what makes this method so very unique, so be sure your hands-on is informative and actually guides the client into a better movement flow. First, continue practicing. Practicing on a friend or a colleague is the best way to go. That way, when you begin working, you’re confident and your client feels good. Brush up on any anatomy that may seem unclear so there’s clarity on where the hands need to be and why.

4) Not Allowing Enough Time for Self-Practice

Exploring the method and the sequences in your on time is an excellent opportunity for you to understand the method in depth and ask yourself questions. What’s familiar, or not familiar? What’s clear, or not clear? Jot your thoughts down to further expand your experience. Personal investigation can help with tapping into your personality within the work, which will help you to become a unique teacher that has something special to offer. See if you can give yourself a full class, throughly going through the material.

5) Shying Away from Feedback

Whether it’s from your mother, partner, or most prized client, it’s essential to know. This helps us improve our work for the present and the future. You can get feedback by asking your trainer, the person your practicing with, or even a client formally via email or informally in person. Both ways are excellent to weigh in what you’ve been doing, how you’ve been doing it, and what else you can achieve. It’s ok to feel lost or over-the moon happy about your feedback, because it’s from that moment that you’ve already grown.

6) Wanting to be the Perfect Teacher for Everyone

Not possible, so let’s go ahead and let that one go. It’s like any relationship or friendship – it takes effort from both persons and forcing it will backfire. When a client doesn’t return after the first class or stops attending all together, look at the situation as a whole. For example, did you allow them to feel/understand the movements? Did they improve with your guided explanation / hands on? Were they resisting, becoming bored? These kinds of questions can help you acknowledge the situation before the client walks out the door. If the client was attentive, showing improvement, and feeling the work, you’ve done your job.

7) Undercharging to Get More Clients

As much as it would be lovely to give away your classes to help build your clientele, unfortunately it’s not viable to sustain. The one-off complimentary class or special offer to create excitement will suffice. All the training you’ve done is worth something. This investment alone entitles you to earn properly even from the start. Clients will come to you and stay with you because of the time and energy you’ve invested and what you have to share. It takes time to build clients on your own while learning how to manage different bodies, personalities, etc., but this is how you build long-lasting clientele.

Honest Oversights When Learning How to Teach the GYROTONIC® Method


Keep learning, moving, and exploring –

Anatomy Trains

GYROTONIC® HQ Blog

Studio Finder


Many Thanks To

Lisa Marie Goodwin
Authorized International GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
Debra Rose
Authorized GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
Dylan Elmore
GYROTONIC® Pre-Trainer & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
 Arsinoi Tsakalogianni
GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
Sandie Wilson
GYROTONIC® Pre-Trainer & GYROKINESIS® Trainer
Adrianna Thompson
Authorized GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer,
Co-creator of GYROTONIC® Application for Dancers
& all of my clients and colleagues.

♥︎

Dance Data Insights the Gyrotonic Method

The Movement Blog is Officially Global

February 11, 2017

Hi movers!

My name is Rob; I’m Kindall’s partner and I’ve recently joined The Movement Blog team to help with the blog. I’m a bit of a geek who likes dance (watching and partaking) and I enjoy taking GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® classes in London as well as cooking and travelling as much as I can.

I’ve spent the last 11 years working in data analytics so will be blogging insights about dance, fitness, gyrotonic and well being. As you may know, Kindall studied Dance Science at Trinity Laban Conservatorie in London. The application of scientific methods to help with injury prevention and performance optimisation has led me to become fascinated by the potential for data to change the way we look at dance and fitness much in the same way that sports science has changed elite performance.

I’m really keen to connect to with the dance community and explore topics which are important to movers all around the world. As such if you have any thoughts or suggestions on areas you’d like us to cover or if you would like to collaborate then you can contact me on rob@themovementblog.co.uk.

The GYROTONIC® Method is a global phenomenon 

One of the first things I did upon joining The Movement Blog officially was to take a look in the Google Analytics account which monitors traffic on the site. To my amazement I saw that since Kindall started the blog, she’s had visitors from 98 different countries. That’s exactly 50% of the world’s countries!

I exported some geographic data in to Tableau Public where I was able to produce some data visualisations which tell us about the global audience of The Movement Blog.

Using the Tableau Public explorer at the bottom of the post you can interact with the analysis I performed and let me know what you think in the comment section below.

Where in the world do people visit The Movement Blog from?

Looking at the map view you really get a sense of how far and wide the blog reaches. For me it shows that The Gyrotonic Method and Dance in general are a truly global phenomenon. We’re active in every continent apart from Antarctica and get visits from new countries all the time. You may notice that that UK and US are greyed out on the viz. I’ve done this because that is where lion’s share (75%+) which you’d expect from US citizen blogging from London ☺️

Visualisation of where people visit The Movement Blog from

Top countries that visit The Movement Blog

By filtering results to countries who have had 100+ visits since the blog started we can get a view on where Kindall’s posts are most popular. After again excluding the UK and US we can see Russia tops the pile followed by Italy, Germany then China. This is unsurprising given all of these countries have a proud tradition of dance as well as excellent schools and dance companies.

Which countries visit The Movement Blog the most

Which continents do people visit from

Without the US & UK data included Europe clearly leads the way from a continental perspective. Asia is a clear second place with strong showings from Japan (where the blog has been translated) and Hong Kong where Kindall tells me there is a big Gyrotonic scene.

Which continents do most visits come from

Top cities which read The Movement Blog

Breaking the data down further to look at the top cities (excluding London) we can see a strong showing from Russia and the US with 4 of the top 7 cities being based there. Dublin leads the way in Europe with Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal and France all being represented.

What next?

We have a saying in the analytics industry which states that data without action is useless! So over the coming months we’d like to expand the focus of The Movement Blog to discuss the Gyrotonic Method and dance in the locations mentioned above. If you’re practicing Gyrotonic or Gyrokinesis in any of the countries or cities in this post and would like to talk to us about your experiences then please get in touch.