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Art Review

Mini Review: Radiant Space Art Gallery, Los Angeles

December 19, 2017
mini review radiant space art gallery los angeles the movement blog kindall payne

Radiant Space Art Gallery is based in Los Angeles, West Hollywood, CA, and thrives from its founders: Daniel Elder, Sean Maurer, Golie Yazdy, Olivia Mia Orozco.

This gallery space hosts art shows, dance, music performances, sound baths, pop up fashion markets and donation based group classes. Mia, the main event coordinator, is a dancer, actress, and all round performing artist, making her a key element to Radiant Space’s network and success. This space has also a great emphasise on women, arts, and wellbeing (check).

mini review radiant space art gallery los angeles the movement blog kindall payne

Current Display: “In This World/ Out of This World”; Taken from Instagram, @radiantspace; photo by @jeremyjacksonphoto

When prompted to host a GYROKINESIS® Group class for the gallery, it was a definite “Yes” right away. As I’ve been based in London for the last 7 years and have just relocated to Lisbon, I haven’t had the pleasure to be apart of or even see the space.
The space is lovely and serves its purpose well. Being in the heart of West Hollywood, this gallery space has already had a lot of foot traffic and art buyers. With a few promotions and word of mouth, I was excited to teach my first class in Los Angeles in years, let alone Radiant Space’s first ever GYROKINESIS® Class.
5 movers were plenty in the space to allow full movement and the necessary student to teacher visibility that this method requires. In L.A.’s “winter” (80° F), we cultivated even more of a sweat and moved as a unit for 1 hour and 30 minutes. The energy was fantastic.
mini review radiant space art gallery los angeles the movement blog kindall payne

Taken from Instagram, @radiantspace; Performing Artist @msmayanicol

What I love about teaching and being involved with a place like Radiant Space is being able to transform the space and connect with a diverse realm of people. From Visual Art, Meditation, Music, Dance, and Fitness, these collaborations advocate what artists love doing the most: supporting and showcasing each other.
I look forward to see what other movement modalities Radiant Space will offer in the gallery in 2018. It’s apparent that this space has already become special to those who founded it and unique to those who’ve discovered it. Keep a look out, Angelenos! Stay tuned to this important space.

Current & Upcoming

mini review radiant space art gallery los angeles the movement blog kindall payne

Taken from Instagram @radiantspace; Image: “Coura” 2017, by Jeremy Jackson, @jeremyjacksonphoto

December 20th
Donation Sound Meditation with Allison Jones 

Currently On Display
In this World / Out of this World: Group Photography Showcase

January 6th
Radiant Space is thrilled to start 2018 with a floor-to-ceiling interactive psychedelic textile cave by Laurie Shapiro

___

Follow Radiant Space here:
Facebook: radiantspaceLA
Instagram: radiant_space
radiantspacela.com
Follow Mia Orozco here:
Instagram: miaorozco
oliviamiaorozco.com

mini review radiant space art gallery los angeles the movement blog kindall payne

Taken from Instagram, @radiant space; photo by @doralynne_valenzuela

More about Radiant Space

Radiant Space is a multimedia gallery in the heart of West Hollywood, CA. At its core, we are a team of creatives who have bonded together to co-create a space for visual arts, film, dance, fashion, and multimedia installations. Our aim is to authentically present work that adds to the global conversation of what it means to have a human experience here and now. We offer our space to rent for creative projects, photo shoots, personal art shows, and special events. We’d love to collaborate with you. Feel free to reach out to us and come join our community.
More about Olivia Mia Orozco
Orozco’s work explores the relationship between the mind and body both as it concerns itself with the movement of dance and from a philosophical point of view. Her work questions and redefines perspective. She enjoys using the camera lens to aide the audience in seeing new facets of the atmosphere in which the dancer is living that may not otherwise be seen in a proscenium setting. It questions the notions of time and from how many viewpoints time can be measured.
As a female artist she explores the defining characteristics of women and is interested in archetypal figures while also questioning the shaping of the modern woman. Her work weaves tales from ancient myths to Hollywood thrillers to create work that both pays homage to classical dance while still maintaining a fresh look of the twenty first century in its interwoven form. Slicing and mingling the old and new, she creates work that aims at authentically presenting her story, thoughts, dreams and ambitions to audiences worldwide via the use of technology and live performance.
Short Stories the Gyrotonic Method

Honest Oversights When Learning How to Teach the GYROTONIC® Method

October 20, 2017
7 mistakes that need attention when teaching the gyrotonic method

First of all, CONGRATULATIONS on your certification and welcome to the world of this unique movement method. For those learning to teach for the first time, especially the GYROTONIC® Method, you might feel like a fish out of water, and that’s normal! Whether you’re in your first week or first year here are some honest oversights that helped me to grow as a trainer. The aim to also guide new trainers to understand why it’s important to positively acknowledge oversights.

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.”
― Albert Einstein


1) Feeling Uncomfortable with New Clients

This can be tricky for new trainers. You’ve learned the sequences but now what do you do with someone not from your training course? Begin slowly but efficiently. The key to working with new clients is making sure that they feel the movements, especially when dealing with different bodies and abilities. Even if you only get to two sequences in the entire hour, that’s all right. 99.9% of the time you won’t teach a class in its full format, so don’t stress out.

2) Freezing in a ‘Creative Class’

Now it’s your time to show all of the work you’ve invested. Don’t shy away from going in different direction than planned. For example, your client(s) could come in with a new or particularly painful area. This calls for you to adhere their needs on the spot, of course. First, relax and gather your thoughts. How could they improve that area within the sequences? Is there anything new you could specifically introduce? Do what you know and work with them in this way, emphasizing key points.

3) Giving Uncertain Hands-On

Hands-On – this is the main name of the game when it comes to teaching the Gyrotonic Method. It’s what makes this method so very unique, so be sure your hands-on is informative and actually guides the client into a better movement flow. First, continue practicing. Practicing on a friend or a colleague is the best way to go. That way, when you begin working, you’re confident and your client feels good. Brush up on any anatomy that may seem unclear so there’s clarity on where the hands need to be and why.

4) Not Allowing Enough Time for Self-Practice

Exploring the method and the sequences in your on time is an excellent opportunity for you to understand the method in depth and ask yourself questions. What’s familiar, or not familiar? What’s clear, or not clear? Jot your thoughts down to further expand your experience. Personal investigation can help with tapping into your personality within the work, which will help you to become a unique teacher that has something special to offer. See if you can give yourself a full class, throughly going through the material.

5) Shying Away from Feedback

Whether it’s from your mother, partner, or most prized client, it’s essential to know. This helps us improve our work for the present and the future. You can get feedback by asking your trainer, the person your practicing with, or even a client formally via email or informally in person. Both ways are excellent to weigh in what you’ve been doing, how you’ve been doing it, and what else you can achieve. It’s ok to feel lost or over-the moon happy about your feedback, because it’s from that moment that you’ve already grown.

6) Wanting to be the Perfect Teacher for Everyone

Not possible, so let’s go ahead and let that one go. It’s like any relationship or friendship – it takes effort from both persons and forcing it will backfire. When a client doesn’t return after the first class or stops attending all together, look at the situation as a whole. For example, did you allow them to feel/understand the movements? Did they improve with your guided explanation / hands on? Were they resisting, becoming bored? These kinds of questions can help you acknowledge the situation before the client walks out the door. If the client was attentive, showing improvement, and feeling the work, you’ve done your job.

7) Undercharging to Get More Clients

As much as it would be lovely to give away your classes to help build your clientele, unfortunately it’s not viable to sustain. The one-off complimentary class or special offer to create excitement will suffice. All the training you’ve done is worth something. This investment alone entitles you to earn properly even from the start. Clients will come to you and stay with you because of the time and energy you’ve invested and what you have to share. It takes time to build clients on your own while learning how to manage different bodies, personalities, etc., but this is how you build long-lasting clientele.

Honest Oversights When Learning How to Teach the GYROTONIC® Method


Keep learning, moving, and exploring –

Anatomy Trains

GYROTONIC® HQ Blog

Studio Finder


Many Thanks To

Lisa Marie Goodwin
Authorized International GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
Debra Rose
Authorized GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
Dylan Elmore
GYROTONIC® Pre-Trainer & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
 Arsinoi Tsakalogianni
GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer
Sandie Wilson
GYROTONIC® Pre-Trainer & GYROKINESIS® Trainer
Adrianna Thompson
Authorized GYROTONIC® & GYROKINESIS® Master Trainer,
Co-creator of GYROTONIC® Application for Dancers
& all of my clients and colleagues.

♥︎

General Fitness and Well–Being Yoga

GUEST POST: The Benefits of Yoga on Anxiety and Depression

August 19, 2016
the benefits of yoga on anxiety and depression

The Benefits of Yoga on Anxiety and Depression

A guest post by The Klinik.

The ancient disciplines of Yoga have been around for centuries and are well known for offering holistic benefits to both mind and body. But when the mind particularly is overwhelmed and struggling with clinical issues such as anxiety and depression, yoga can offer extended benefits.

Exercise benefits everybody

There is a basic school of thought, based on research, which acknowledges that most forms of exercise, including yoga, can boost mental health as exercising releases endorphins, hormones responsible for that ‘feel good’ factor generally experienced at the end of a workout.

However, as reported in The Telegraph, research has shown that the levels of GABA, an amino acid which supports brain and central nervous system function, also increases in individuals who practice yoga. With low levels of GABA acknowledged as contributing towards low mood and anxiety, these increased levels of GABA following practice of yoga additionally promote well-being and calm, as well as reducing depression and anxiety.

Calming stress response

In the modern world, the intrinsic ‘fight or flight’ stress responses which kept our hunting and gathering ancestors alive are still very much present. These genetic responses are susceptible to many triggers in the modern world, such as physical and mental stress of the workplace and pressure in other areas of life, such as responsibility, finance and lifestyle. Essentially, the practice of yoga stimulates opposing responses to that ‘fight or flight’ reaction, triggering instead the parasympathetic nervous system to a ‘rest and digest’ response, which literally calms the stress responses and brings balance in the face of pressure.

the benefits of yoga on anxiety and depression

But as well as the hormonal relief to stress responses, the ancient meditative, relaxation and breathing techniques which are a fundamental part of yoga practice align with modern Cognitive Behaviour Training (CBT) and stress-management techniques, regularly offered as contemporary treatment for anxiety and depression. By learning the appropriate relaxation techniques as part of a yoga class or private tuition, individuals have a wider range of methods to use when stressful situations arise. These holistic benefits of yoga also make it the ideal exercise to prepare for or wind down from the day, in a way which is protective of well-being and can even be preventative against problems.

And breathe…

Breathing control, one of the basic techniques of yoga, can help to reduce stress in difficult situations and offer relief during episodes of anxiety attacks. Mastery of breathing techniques, even at an early stage of participating in yoga, is frequently advocated as helping to relieve stress and anxiety. The breathing techniques used throughout the disciplines of yoga include many cyclical breathing patterns, including slow, focused breathing which calms symptoms of stress and anxiety.

Other yoga breathing techniques include controlled rapid breathing for stimulation, which can also benefit depression by lifting mood, whilst focused breathing can also significantly benefit pain relief, lifting mood and increasing feelings of wellness as pain reduces to manageable levels.

Stress versus spirit

The breathing and relaxation techniques which underpin yoga practice also offer an opportunity to explore and develop a spiritual outlet. Focusing the mind elsewhere can reduce a sense of overwhelm which is often attendant with anxiety and depression, instead offering an alternative way to shift the focus from negative and overwhelming thoughts.

the benefits of yoga on anxiety and depression

Body and mind

The physical benefits of yoga also play a part in reducing depression and anxiety. Many individuals carry stress and anxiety as tension in the body, which can cause pain and contribute to long-term health conditions. The regular practice of yoga can help to reduce tension hot-spots in the body and relieve the effects of the additional stress this puts on the mind and body.

Additionally, yoga has recognised benefits of offering significant relief to many ailments such as respiratory complaints, digestive difficulties, circulatory problems and Arthritis. The benefits of yoga as a natural form of pain relief to physical ailments can also reduce anxiety and relieve some of the stress and depression related to living with a chronic health complaint.

In this way, yoga may also help to reduce anxiety and depression related to health conditions by improving body awareness. Practising yoga reduces mental and physical stress, reducing strain on the body and improving understanding of how the body works and responds, techniques which, once learned, individuals can use to control responses and calm anxieties.

Although holding a yoga pose may appear to just involve the body, there is both a physical and mental response to each yoga pose (Asansa). To carry out the asansa, correct breathing and relaxation techniques are required throughout, all of which require concentration and a physical response from the brain which sees a reduction in nerve chemicals, such as the stress hormone adrenaline, and relaxes the body’s other stress responses such as heart rate and blood pressure. As each pose targets a different system in the body, all systems respond with a stress reduction.

As such, regular yoga practice can also benefit heart rate and blood pressure, both of which relate closely to those ‘fight or flight’ responses and usually increase significantly during stressful situations. Regulating these with those ‘rest and digest’ triggers can help the body to respond to stress more effectively and help to minimise the impact of anxiety on the body.

the benefits of yoga on anxiety and depression

The group factor

Finally, it’s also suggested that taking part in an exercise class such as Yoga can also be beneficial to mental health and in warding off depression. As reported by the BBC, following studies at Oxford University, exercising in a group can lead to an enhanced level of endorphin release, those ‘happiness’ hormones which can boost well-being.

Being part of a yoga group also challenges depression by offering a sense of community and belonging, particularly when participating as a group in a therapeutic exercise such as one of the many disciplines of yoga. Those disciplines such as Hatha, Anusara and Restorative Yoga, which use techniques for relaxation and meditation, are particularly beneficial for those looking for support with anxiety and depression.


Content provided by The Klinik.

Stock photos provided by The Klinik, Pixabay & Pexels.

Selected links researched added by The Klinik & The Movement Blog.


Want to write a guest post for The Movement Blog? Contact Kindall here for more information.
Dance the Gyrotonic Method Tips

Take Home Tips #1: For Dancers

March 1, 2016
journey back to dance #3: mental and physical preparation

Here are a few tips my dance clients receive during and after a GYROTONIC® class that I would like to share.

These tips are essentially all taught during a dance class, however, private and semi-private training allows an individual to focus on the areas that need more improvement to provide even more depth and clarity.

Private or small group training also allows the individual to understand their own body and in their own time. Although these tips and suggestions are a few out of many, it provides an idea of what goes on in a GYROTONIC® class and how it can be beneficial to further improve dance performance.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Maintain a Neutral Pelvis

Often times dancers (well, anyone) tend to have either posterior or anterior tilt in the pelvis, in which they also tend to use during movement. While moving in this way may appear successful, problems and injuries that may occur (i.e. stiff hips and back) is, of course, not very useful to maintain longevity.
A dancer can avoid this common mistake by maintaining a neutral pelvis, especially while standing. This connection can help provide the dancer a great way to practice and ‘preparation’ (the moment before you begin to move).
An example of a pelvis that’s not in neutral is when a dancer is ‘tucking’ or arching in the lower back. So when this happens, when the working leg comes back into a position, the rotation muscles aren’t able to engage properly. When this leg movement is done properly with a neutral pelvis this means that the inner thighs and abdominals get the chance to work.
Therefore, I encourage dancers to practice maintaining a neutral pelvis (and spine) before a class/performance by either doing homework given from the sessions or a few tendus and pliés with the same principle.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Rotate the Whole Leg

Another common sight in dancers is over rotation, of the foot in relation to the rest of the leg. While this may be aesthetically pleasing, this often means that true rotation is not being used. This is especially important in plies and tendus.
Using rotation the of the whole leg is will also help avoid injuries such as knee and ankle problems. In the Gyrotonic hamstring exercises, clients are able to work on proper rotation (both internal and external) lying down which reduces pressure in the spine and allows more freedom in the hip. This way, the body can be more prepared when standing.
During the hamstring exercises, it is reiterated to use energy through the entire leg to rotate from the hip, where the foot and toes will follow. Maintaining this connection will help to engage the appropriate muscles and therefore improve turn out.
I advise my clients to take time before class, especially those with hips problems/ pain, to warm up the turn out muscles by practicing the corrections and homework exercises learned from our sessions. This way the dancer can notice when old habits come back or when the pelvis tends to move unnecessarily as mentioned above.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Shoulders Wide Not Just Down

Dance requires a lot of upper body movement thus, it can be easy to overuse the muscles that surround the shoulder girdle as well as the muscles that are used for rotation.  The aim is to engage the appropriate muscles to support the back especially within movement. Instead reach the shoulders wide not just down. This way, when the arms are moving, the back is engaged and the arms can move more freely.
In addition, a common theme in the Gyrotonic Method are arm movements that lead with the elbow while maintaining a long bend (often the same for leg movements as well), which is very useful for the use of port de bras.
Leading with the back of the arm while maintaining a long bend in the elbow can further aid in the correct use of the shoulder girdle and rotation in the arm. The wider the shoulders, the longer the line, and the more efficient the arms will be when passing through positions quickly (like this amazing example).

take home tips #1: for dancers

Rib Cage Connection

Due to dancers usually being flexible or hyperflexible, I often see a few common alignment deviations. One of them being a lack of rib cage connection standing, sitting, and in movement. Finding and maintaining this connection helps to support the back and maintain balance.
The ‘back support’ that the ribcage connection provides is also important for use of the back of the leg. However, feeling this is a dance class is difficult of course, therefore I often instruct my clients to actually relax the ribs and lengthen the back of the body to then move.
Being too far forward or backward throws the body out of alignment, which makes it difficult to stand, use the legs, and turn. Use the connection of the ribcage as an aid to stand taller, feel the legs, and become aware the the ‘back body’.
Gyrotonic exercises emphasize maintaining a ribcage connection in all planes of movement (i.e. lying down, sitting, standing, rotation). Breathing also helps to find less tension, the proper amount of engagement, length, and expansion.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Not Everything is a Stretch

It can be difficult to resist the temptation to use a pilè or cambré forward as an opportunity to stretch maximally during the beginning of a class, for instance. Warming up allows the body to engage and maintain stability throughout the rest of the class (while reducing the change for injury).
Exercises taught in the beginning of class may require the dancer to already be warm. Otherwise, use the beginning of class as an opportunity to warm up. Additionally, obtaining a ‘long line’ in the body requires both proper alignment and strength to achieve an appropriate range of motion.
The Gyrotonic Method focuses heavily on drawing energy internally to create external movement to then provide the desired length and/or stretch. Thus it’s important not to focus solely on the aesthetic of the movement.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Stay with the Tempo

Timing is often crucial as it helps to make a dancer more musical. This, in turn, can help the dancer fire necessary muscles needed, which allows the dancer to overcome bad habits. Knowing how to stay with the tempo when learning a movement or phrase can further improve personal interpretation of musicality, coordination, and expression.
What makes the Gyrotonic method different from other forms of exercise is how it helps to create long, full movements with different qualities and playful rhythms. Within a Gyrotonic class, different tempos and rhythms are also specifically used to help increase awareness and strength (just liked dance).
It’s important to remember that movement can involve different qualities, textures, and phrasing. Within a Gyrotonic session, clients are allowed to first learn the movement properly while gradually adding the breathe and the rhythm. If movement proves to become difficult to keep up, I ask my clients to ‘check in’ to see what connections/engagements may have been lost.

Taking class and practicing movement is a time for an individual to become more knowledgeable and attuned with the body. Take time to ‘check in’ with what your body needs and how you need to achieve it.

Happy dancing!
xo

Dance

A Journey Back to Dance #2: Taking Class Again

October 22, 2015

Going back to class, sticking with it, and loving it is mentally and physically hard work.

What’s really different now (as I return) is how I think during each class.

There are very good options for dancers based here in London. However, it’s usually useful to know which class to attend. Thanks to recommendations of other dancers and dancing at schools like London Contemporary Dance School, I was guided towards the right teachers and environments that could suit my personal needs. 

Although the teacher and environment may be fantastic, that doesn’t mean getting back into the groove won’t be frightening! It takes will-power, dedication, and persistence. Once bad habits are out and good habits start coming in, chances are you’re going to love what you do through thick and thin (love a good impromptu rhyme).

Here are some points to consider when going back to class after a long (or short) break:

Do it for yourself

There’s nothing worse (for yourself) than dreading class and then continuing to dread the class in its duration. As my former teacher, Maurya Kerr, would say ‘pick one thing to work on today […] and do it to the fullest’. It’s like writing an essay: first write an outline, expand on different parts at a time until you begin to see the whole picture, and finally, keep editing by taking out what’s unnecessary and expand your knowledge again. For me, unnecessary = over critical instructors; necessary = space to grow and learn.

There’s always something to work towards

Practicing and rehearsing are one of those challenges that just keeps on giving. Everyday will prove different as it should. As Juili Horvath once said, “never compare with others or yesterday”. Embrace learning new things about yourself and the environment. What have you noticed? What’s going on? How are you responding or not responding? See if the body and mind can work together, for instance.

Use your wildest imagination

Bad days happen. Oh well. That’s the perk of being persistent; overcoming pitfalls. Imagination can be anecdotal, anatomical, abstract, a sound, a feeling, etc. You name it, you use it. Did you know that, “for improvement […] to be permanent, changes need to come from your body image […] new patterns need to become a part of your identity or you’ll always slip back into old habits.” Thank you Eric Franklin.

Do what feels good

Listen to your body. Going back to class requires attention (probably more than before) and letting go of old habits. The body is most likely in a new place and a new state. Overworking and forcing the body into positions will only go so far. If needed, start with a simple class and work your way up. Do non-dance activities in between dance classes to feel prepared mentally and physically. The hardest thing for dancers is to slow down or acknowledging pain. So, my advice? Keep calm and acknowledge any discomforts. 

Until next time, dancers!