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The Movement Blog is Back! Here’s What We’ve Been Up To + What’s Coming Up Next

September 13, 2017
the movement blog is back - here's what to expect

Hi Movers!

We are back from our hiatus and are winding down in Lisbon, Portugal for a different change of pace. I’m excited to announce that I will begin teaching the GYROKINESIS® method at the ever-so charming Little Yoga Space in Baixa-Chiado from October 2017. Stay tuned for more details. However, if you’re looking for GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® classes in London feel free to contact me, look at our recommended studios, or check out gyrotonic.com.
Rob and I have missed you all dearly! In the last 6 months, we’ve explored Southeast Asia, got married, and trekked through South America. Therefore to really enjoy our experience, we wanted to take a break from technology. We then spent a lot of our time on buses and trains discussing what 2017/2018 will look like for The Movement Blog. We’ve even experimented with Podcast audio to use for interviewing trainers, dancers, etc. Stay tuned for the launch of The Movement Pod.
Moreover, we have the following lined up:
  • An interview with Yolanda Corrales, a Gyrotonic Trainer, dancer and actress from Madrid, Spain who is now based in California
  • A second interview with Nonie Yung, a Specialized Master GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® Trainer, Pilates Instructor, and dancer from and based in Hong Kong
  • Surveys for Dancers – an International Dance census by Rob Jackson
  • Why the GYROKINESIS® Method and Yoga Can Go Hand in Hand
  • Spotlight on our recommended studio: Kings Cross Studios, London
  • Inside: My GYROKINESIS® Certification in Münstertal, Germany

Don’t forget to subscribe to The Movement Blog for updates!

We look forward to catching up,

Kindall & Rob

XO

the movement blog is back - here's what to expect

Dance Short Stories the Gyrotonic Method

The Importance of Breathing & the GYROTONIC® Method by Lucia Vergnano (GUEST POST)

April 29, 2017
guest post: breathing again, lucia vergnano

 Lucia Vergnano is a Dancer with Aterballetto Dance Company, a Mother, and a GYROTONIC® Trainer based in Reggio Emilia, Italy. Vergnano now contributes to an blog called Mamma, Mi Racconti (Italian for Mom, Tell Me).

In this post, Vergnano shares her thoughts on breathing, the importance of oxygen, and how the GYROTONIC® Method helped her further understand this necessity.


BREATHING AGAIN by Lucia Vergnano

[Translated by Lucia Vergnano from ‘UNA MAMMA IN GYRO‘ (A mother in Gyro) – ‘Juggling family, dance, travels and the Gyrotonic Method’]

guest post: breathing again, lucia vergnano

Each of us as a child breathes, breathes well, without any constraints or problems. Then, with time, we forget. We get stuck. The mind begins to control our breathing unconsciously. We do not think it’s so important anymore.

What are the consequences? Aches, muscle pain, joint pain, stomach ache, headache to name a few… I am not saying it all depends on how we breathe, but it is certainly influential, and knowing how to breathe well could help to prevent these problems.

For example, musicians use instruments to make music, painters use brushes and colors and dancers use the body. The body and soul of the dancer are their tools and, as every tool must be treated with care, it should be cleaned, polished and pampered.

What better ingredient to feed your body than oxygenOxygenating  your blood, muscles and mind correctly means preventing contractions. It means learning to maintain a correct posture and dealing with stressful moments (which are plentiful!) in a more conscious way. 

In addition, the diaphragm is the muscle that has the main role in breathing, in which the Gyrotonic Method truly teaches how to make the diaphragm more elastic and, at the same time, stronger in order to control it voluntarily.

The Gyrotonic Method also teaches us that a certain type of breathing must be associated with each type of movement: a gentle and deep breath when movement is wide and slow; a more rhythmic one if the movement is fast and small; and a stronger and more intense one if the movement requires greater physical strength.

Improving my breathing has greatly helped to increase my physical strength, mobility and prevent injuries. I feel that Gyrotonic is a method that can really work for anyone, regardless of age or physical fitness. It is a method that helps people to breathe consciously to oxygenate both the body and mind.

After practicing the Gyrotonic method and its breathing techniques for years, it has definitely made a difference. Just couple of hours a week and you will see a change in your life, because knowing how to take a deep breath at the right moment can change your day. 


More About Lucia Vergana

guest post: breathing again, lucia vergnano

Lucia, 33, was born in Turin but moved to Florence to follow her dream to become a ballerina. And she did. In the last 15 years Vergnano has been working as a professional dancer, first with Balletto di Roma in Rome, then with Aterballetto in Reggio Emilia.

However, while dancing in Rome, Vergnano became injured but was fortunately introduced to the Gyrotonic Method. From that moment on, she realized that she didn’t want to be without this method, so pursued to becoming an instructor.

She has been married to Hektor, who is also a dancer, for 3 years. They met in Rome in 2000 and after a difficult start they decided to try to build a life together. A little more than 2 years ago she became a Mother to Lorenzo, which is her “greatest pride and joy.”


Follow Lucia Vergnano here:

Mamma, Mi Raconnti

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Dance Data Insights the Gyrotonic Method

The Movement Blog is Officially Global

February 11, 2017

Hi movers!

My name is Rob; I’m Kindall’s partner and I’ve recently joined The Movement Blog team to help with the blog. I’m a bit of a geek who likes dance (watching and partaking) and I enjoy taking GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® classes in London as well as cooking and travelling as much as I can.

I’ve spent the last 11 years working in data analytics so will be blogging insights about dance, fitness, gyrotonic and well being. As you may know, Kindall studied Dance Science at Trinity Laban Conservatorie in London. The application of scientific methods to help with injury prevention and performance optimisation has led me to become fascinated by the potential for data to change the way we look at dance and fitness much in the same way that sports science has changed elite performance.

I’m really keen to connect to with the dance community and explore topics which are important to movers all around the world. As such if you have any thoughts or suggestions on areas you’d like us to cover or if you would like to collaborate then you can contact me on rob@themovementblog.co.uk.

The GYROTONIC® Method is a global phenomenon 

One of the first things I did upon joining The Movement Blog officially was to take a look in the Google Analytics account which monitors traffic on the site. To my amazement I saw that since Kindall started the blog, she’s had visitors from 98 different countries. That’s exactly 50% of the world’s countries!

I exported some geographic data in to Tableau Public where I was able to produce some data visualisations which tell us about the global audience of The Movement Blog.

Using the Tableau Public explorer at the bottom of the post you can interact with the analysis I performed and let me know what you think in the comment section below.

Where in the world do people visit The Movement Blog from?

Looking at the map view you really get a sense of how far and wide the blog reaches. For me it shows that The Gyrotonic Method and Dance in general are a truly global phenomenon. We’re active in every continent apart from Antarctica and get visits from new countries all the time. You may notice that that UK and US are greyed out on the viz. I’ve done this because that is where lion’s share (75%+) which you’d expect from US citizen blogging from London ☺️

Visualisation of where people visit The Movement Blog from

Top countries that visit The Movement Blog

By filtering results to countries who have had 100+ visits since the blog started we can get a view on where Kindall’s posts are most popular. After again excluding the UK and US we can see Russia tops the pile followed by Italy, Germany then China. This is unsurprising given all of these countries have a proud tradition of dance as well as excellent schools and dance companies.

Which countries visit The Movement Blog the most

Which continents do people visit from

Without the US & UK data included Europe clearly leads the way from a continental perspective. Asia is a clear second place with strong showings from Japan (where the blog has been translated) and Hong Kong where Kindall tells me there is a big Gyrotonic scene.

Which continents do most visits come from

Top cities which read The Movement Blog

Breaking the data down further to look at the top cities (excluding London) we can see a strong showing from Russia and the US with 4 of the top 7 cities being based there. Dublin leads the way in Europe with Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal and France all being represented.

What next?

We have a saying in the analytics industry which states that data without action is useless! So over the coming months we’d like to expand the focus of The Movement Blog to discuss the Gyrotonic Method and dance in the locations mentioned above. If you’re practicing Gyrotonic or Gyrokinesis in any of the countries or cities in this post and would like to talk to us about your experiences then please get in touch.

Dance General Fitness and Well–Being the Gyrokinesis Method the Gyrotonic Method Tips Travel

A Mini Dance & Fitness Guide: the Pacific Northwest

February 8, 2017
dancing up the pacific northwest

Being in the States for Christmas and New Years for the first time in a while meant being able to visit family, friends, teachers and studios I know and love along the Pacific Northwest.

After a very relaxing time in Los Angeles, it was time for an adventure to discover something new. This meant travelling (and dancing) for at least one week along the Pacific Northwest coastline from San Francisco all the way to Vancouver by train or bus. Consider this to be your Mini Dance and Fitness Guide to these prominent and inspiring cities. Enjoy!


San Francisco Bay Area, CA

dancing up the pacific northwest

Home to San Francisco Ballet, LINES Ballet, Smuin BalletODC Theater, AXIS Dance Company, Tiny Pistol, and many other beautiful dance companies. The Bay Area also contributes heavily to the GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® scene.
As my former stomping ground, this visit included a class at Alonzo King LINES Dance Center with ever evolving Erik Wagner and a catch up with my former Gyrotonic Master Trainer, Debra Rose from SF GYROTONIC®.
Before leaving the Bay Area, I was able to squeeze in a Gyrotonic group class with Trainer Mike Luque from The Working Body in Oakland (whom I wrote an article for his blog but never met). Luque’s new space offers a lot of other types of classes too such as boxing, pilates, yoga and personal training.
What Else to Check Out
Dance Companies
Inside Out Contemporary
Dawson Dance
Liss Fain Dance
LEVY Dance
Robert Moses’ Kin
Gyrotonic & Gyrokinesis Studios
The Seed Center
Marin Gyrotonic


 Portland, OR

dancing up the pacific northwest

Home to the infinitely cool Northwest Dance Project and BodyVox studios. Unfortunately during my January visit, this city was literally iced over, which made it difficult to get around in a short amount of time.
However the beauty of the Coast Starlight sleeper train from Jack London Square, Oakland satisfied my travel appetite with its stunning views and spacious cabins.
I did, however, briefly speak to Emma Kingston, the Gyrotonic Master Trainer and owner of Center Gyrotonic, to discuss the happenings of a future interview with her about the Gyrotonic Method, dance, fitness, and all of that good stuff.
What Else to Check Out
Dance Teacher and Choreographer
Katie Scherman
Gyrotonic / Gyrokinesis / Reformer Pilates
Kinespirit Circle

Seattle, WA

dancing up the pacific northwest

Velocity Dance Center on 12 Ave. Seattle, WA. January 18th, 2017.

This is the quaint (and very rainy) hometown of Pacific Northwest Ballet, Velocity Dance Center, and Cornish College of the Arts. Here, I took a Masterclass with Lavinia Vago from Montreal’s renowned RUBBERBANDance Group.
We moved, danced, and increased our heartbeats continuously for nearly 1.5 hours (in the style of Gaga‘s movement language), then learned some the company’s repertoire. IT WAS AMAZING. Keep an eye on Velocity Dance Centre for future workshops and masterclasses.
What Else to Check Out
Open Dance Class Program at PNB
 Sessions with Magali Messac at Gyrotonic Seattle
Gyrotonic, Gyrokinesis and Yoga at Seattle Changing Rooms

Vancouver, B.C.

dancing up the pacific northwest

English Bay Beach. Beginning of the waterfront bicycle path around the Seawall at Stanley Park. January 20th, 2017.

Crossed the border for the last stop and lucked out with a sunny day. However, I had an even shorter time to explore the city, so spend the only full day to explore Vancouver by biking the world’s longest uninterrupted waterfront path, the Seawall at Stanley Park.
28km later, this waterfront-only pathway was very fulfilling. I also got to practice photographing this city’s stunning scenery with my new camera. For skiing enthusiasts, this is your city. Vancouver’s known for their local ski resorts, just 20 mins away, also includes night skiing.
What Else to Check Out
Organic Eats
Cafe Medina
Aphrodite’s Organic Cafe and Pie Shop
Dance Companies
Kidd Pivot
Ballet BC
Exercise & Nature
Grouse MountainCypress Mountain, Mount Seymour
Local Day and Nighttime Ski Slopes
Whistler Blackcomb
Larger Ski Resort with Hiking Trails

This jam packed trip opened my eyes to the Dance, Fitness and Gyrotonic world. Taking class and understanding the style and vibe of the city was definitely the highlight of the trip. Looking forward to the next adventure.
dancing up the pacific northwest

Mendocino Bay, Northern California.

General Fitness and Well–Being the Gyrokinesis Method the Gyrotonic Method Tips

Health & Fitness Goals: How the Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis Methods Can Support You in the New Year

December 31, 2016
how the gyrotonic and gyrokinesis methods can support your fitness goals

As we move on towards another new year, here we go again with our resolutions and goals. According to sites like Statistic Brain and The Guardian, in 2015, people’s top ten resolutions included: losing weight, staying fit and healthy, and wanting to learn something new.

In fact, 38%-47% of people set fitness and self-improvement related resolutions for the new year. The good news is that we don’t have to wait for start of a new year for us to reset our goals. It’s OK to have ever-evolving goals, so change it up and be very specific.

how the gyrotonic and gyrokinesis methods can support your fitness goals

I personally believe that everyone is a mover, a dancer, a groover and, yes, we should want more health and fitness goals for ourselves. When it comes to resetting goals it might be best to take a different approach. If I want to incorporate more exercise into my new year goals but know I’m not a big fan of running, then my goal should be to ‘find a new exercise that I enjoy’ instead.
From teaching the GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® Methods, Dance and even Barre classes – a lot of people are aware that they are ‘not a dancer’ and become timid with three-dimensional movements. Anything from walking, running to the train, standing up to get a cup of coffee, to sitting for long hours requires proper alignment and a certain level fitness. Posture, alignment,and fitness awareness can help maintain a healthy body for the long term, which I’m sure will compliment any other fitness goals you may have for the new year!

Here are a few important ways the GYROTONIC® and GYROKINESIS® Methods can help you with your fitness goals.

how the gyrotonic and gyrokinesis methods can support your fitness goals

GYROKINESIS® Floor Exercises contribute in stretching the hamstrings, adductors, abductors, shoulder, pectorals & strengthening the abdomen, biceps, deltoids, back extensors, and arches – just to name a few.

Awareness of Posture

Posture is such a big deal. We’ve heard it from our elders and our mothers and now you’re hearing it again. There are even posture apps that exist to support this importance. Posture isn’t just the spine. There are a lot of muscles involved in both sitting, standing, and walking. In order for us to adhere to those muscles we must focus on how the body should be moving as a whole. Clients have told me that they’ve felt improvement within their alignment the minute they’re finished their session.

Improved Alignment Overtime

Realigning the body, both muscularly and skeletally, from years and years of bad habits take time and over that time it’s important to realign correctly and efficiently. Alignment is especially important for balance and appropriate range of motion in the joints. Without this, the joints become impacted and no longer have room to move causing unwanted pain. Therefore, these methods (and its equipment) focus on the prevention and reduction of joint impact. Therefore, when this kind of alignment is maintained, usual areas of pain and stiffness are less present.

Strengthens While You Stretch

Functional flexibility supports strength and strength supports flexibility. Without one or the other your body could be in danger or prone to injury/pain. Both methods allow the body to move in its natural three-dimensional makeup. Without this type of movement the body can become rigid and resistant. In other words, we want our body to be able to respond to movement and impact like a rubber band: with elasticity (longevity) and strength (sustainability).

Improves Other Workouts

I always see more  improvement in my dancing, yoga practice, standing, walking, and even running when I’m taking Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis classes regularly. This also goes for all sports enthusiasts and professional performers (i.e. Andy Murray as pictured in the cover photo). Many of my clients who play football, swim, row, etc. said that they’ve never have felt or performed better. It’s completely necessary that the body is challenged in all ranges, so when you need to focus on a specific area or exercise the entire body is all set up to support you and these methods do just that.

how the gyrotonic and gyrokinesis methods can support your fitness goals

No matter what your fitness goals are this year, next year, and beyond, be sure to try something new. In addition, you’ll never know what kind of positive reaction your body may have with experiencing full bodied movements that the Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis Methods have to offer. It might be just the thing you’ll need for you aches and pains to be relieved once and for all.

Happy New Year and Beyond!

Love,

Kindall & Rob

TheMovementBlog

How the Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis Methods Can Improve Health and Fitness Goals

Dance General Fitness and Well–Being the Gyrokinesis Method the Gyrotonic Method Tips Yoga

Best New Blogs in Dance, Health, and Fitness in 2016

October 7, 2016
best new blogs in dance health and fitness

Above: Mara Cimatoribus, founder and blogger of SHE-SMILES

In no particular order – these new blog platforms are equally amazing, inspiring and necessary for dance, fitness, health, and wellbeing enthusiasts alike.

One thing these blogs have in common is that all of the founders/creators/directors/bloggers took the initiative to use their experience and knowledge to create a fun, enthusiastic place for other like minded people out of the goodness of their hearts. Check out these topics ranging from ballet fitness to self-esteem improvement to yummy innovative recipes.

Lazy Dancer Tips – Best New Dance Vlog

best new dance health and fitness blogs

Former dancer of Royal New Zealand Ballet and current dancer in New English Ballet Theatre Lugoboni seriously doesn’t miss a beat in her new blog. Nearly everyday, dancers have access to exercises and tips on everything from ‘how to tie your pointe shoes’ to ‘how to exercise on the beach’.
Lazy may not be the case ‘per se’, but this lovely laid back approach to using ballet as fitness is accessible to anyone for anytime and everywhere. It is, of course, also great for those already deep in the ballet game. She’s got your back with in depth yet simple explanations of how to improve leg extensions, balance, and port de bras, just to name a few.
In addition, Iacopo Di Luigi, Lugoboni’s other half and business partner, works in Visual Effects and clearly has an eye for detail. This great collaboration manages to create the dynamic combination between video and blogging, which works flawlessly with both depth and clarity.
Follow this blog and you’ll never be out of touch with improving your fitness, ballet technique, and the cuteness of Lugoboni’s cats!

Sweet Om Yoga – Best New Yoga Instagram Account

best new dance health and fitness blogs

Not a formal blog, but Filitsa Thomopoulou’s photos are extremely well shot. She manages to capture some of the most intriguing yoga poses in unique angles. They all seem to tell a story, like a dance. This former ballerina ( á la the National Greek Opera School of Dance) has transformed her life from the stage to the mat after foregoing hip surgery. After living and dancing in London she returned back to her home in Athens, Greece and now teaches yoga full time.
She’s now beginning to incorporate video on her Instagram account, which further adds to the dance-like element; flowing into poses as if one sentence. Instagram and yoga have quickly become the perfect combination – and it’s everywhere. So what sets this account apart? Her precision and poise. Suitable for those who want to see how someone uses their technique to the fullest, safely and beautifully.
Traveling to Greece? Contact Thomopoulou for her class schedule here.

Wavelength – Best New GYROTONIC® Blog

best new dance health and fitness blogs

Thanks to Cina Canada, founder/producer/director of Human Picture Initiative and now (thankfully) Media Coordinator at GYROTONIC® International Headquarters, the very much global yet exclusive Gyrotonic community official have outlet direct from the source. Here – trainers, clients and anyone else alike can be informed with what others trainers and master trainers are doing  and, most importantly, read what they have to say.
Useful sections and series includes ‘Tips for Trainers by Trainers‘ and  specialized course highlights where Master Trainers are interviews to further explain the development of the course and, basically, ‘what inspired them?’. Gyrotonic headquarters also have a YouTube channel that features ‘The Gyrotonic Interview Series‘ (a must-see).
I have a great gut feeling that the Gyrotonic community fully appreciates to finally have this kind of dialogue accessible and out in the open. Always wanted to know more about the Gyrotonic Method and how it can improve your technique, posture and alignment? This blog is not to be missed.

Dance Longer, Dance Stronger – Best New Dance Science Blog

best new dance health and fitness blogs
Insights on dance, dance science, and injury prevention? Yes, please. Dance Longer, Dance Stronger was founded and entirely created by, budding entrepreneur, Claire Farmer. Farmer doesn’t seem to take ‘no’ for an answer, especially when it comes to improving the dance community. So much so, she’s just created an app called The Performers Health Hub, which is now available!
During and after obtaining her MSc Dance Science degree, Farmer seemed to quickly know in which direction she was headed. Her goal was (and is) to find ways that important and useful information is available to dancers, especially involving health-related issues as she clearly describes on her website.
Want to know more about Dance Science and how to get involved? This one is definitely for you. You can also check out a range of articles that Farmer’s arranged that include topics such as “Anxiety and the Dancer” and “Health Before Money”.

Lucy Panou, Best New Lifestyle Blog

best new dance health and fitness blogs

Lucy Panou is so matter-of-fact and to the point,  I can only imagine that girls around the world are feel like they finally relate and feel right at home with her insightful and plentiful posts. Clearly written and driven from personal experiences, Panou dons an MSc in Dance Science as well as a certification in Lifestyle Coaching.
Her background as a dancer and the experience she’s had with body image further proves that she’s hugely passionate about what she courageously brings to the surface. Her straight to point blog posts include topics such as “Why Perfectionism is a Pain in the Ass […] and “How to Conquer Resiliency“.
In addition, she currently has a free package called “Discover How to Love Yourself and Your Body”, which includes an ebook amongst other useful information, like how to ‘Stop Worrying About the Mirror’. Don’t just take my word for it, see what Lucy’s clients have to say by scrolling down to the bottom on her home page.
Want a self-esteem boost? Contact Panou directly for advice here.

She Smiles, Best New Food Blog

best new dance health and fitness blogs

If you love acquiring new ideas for food then you’ll fully appreciate this one. The blog was created by Italian native and now Londoner, Mara Cimatoribus, after she realized she wanted to live and eat healthier. Within first glance, you’ll be able to tell you’re in for dozens of treats. Cimatoribus’s recipes are original, innovative and fresh, and provides mostly vegan and plant-based recipes.
She’s begun a section that documents her travel experiences. Here, she shares ‘where to stay’ and, of course, ‘where and what to eat’. Her photos are stunning and will no doubt will inspire you to visit said places and eat all of the food! So far, she’s documented her stays in Marrakech, Puglia, and Albuquerque. Stay tuned for more.
Cimatoribus also usefully puts together a range of suggestions for beauty, wellness, kitchen products, books and more (here’s an example). Once you’ve opened the menu on the homepage, scroll down and click on ‘Shop’ to explore.

Enjoy!

the Gyrokinesis Method the Gyrotonic Method

Why I Chose to Train in the GYROKINESIS® Method

May 17, 2016
why i chose to train in the gyrokinesis method

In 2010, I became a certified GYROTONIC® Trainer. I was also taking GYROKINESIS® classes during that time frame as it was a part of my dance curriculum at the LINES Ballet/ BFA program, however I chose the GYROTONIC® Method as my career backup. Over the years, while still practicing a bit at home and as a warmup before dance class, I began taking less and less GYROKINESIS® classes.

Only about a year ago, when I started working at Tranquility Pilates Centre, I began taking Gyrokinesis class with Trainer Allison which was held at the studio 11AM on Saturdays right after I was done teaching. Then I remembered that I really did miss it! Sparking my interest in the original stool and mat work version, I decided to go back to Gyrokinesis training.

I then began my pre-training and foundation course at Kings Cross Studios with Dylan Elmore. Now that I’m a Gyrotonic Apprentice, I love holding super cheap and accessible group classes for everyone. I’m definitely looking forward to teaching classes outdoors and just about anywhere!

Here are a few key reasons why I returned to GYROKINESIS® Method after teaching the GYROTONIC® Method for 6 years.

why i chose to train in the gyrokinesis method

 

  1. It’s the foundation of the GYROTONIC® method.

    Before the Gyrotonic machine was even dreamed of, creator, Juliu Horvath investigated his own injury prevention technique that was originally called ‘Yoga for Dancers’, which quickly developed into what we know today as the GYROKINESIS® method. Classes are normally conducted without stopping and with continuous movement.

  2. No machine required!

    Beach, park, and home visits here we come. This means less exclusivity and more affordability.
    As there aren’t a lot of Gyrotonic studios in London that offer Gyrotonic group equipment classes, I can finally get a taste of working with many different people and abilities at once with Gyrokinesis group classes. Not only is alignment important but so is the rhythm of the class.

  3. The diversity of a group class challenges my teaching style.

    Teaching 1 to 1 is quite different from teaching a group class. Therefore I am challenged to slightly change my teaching style to adapt to many abilities at once. By doing so, I have learned to let the client continue move and find their own corrections as I have to guide them verbally.

  4. I get to be more physical as a teacher.

    Teaching a group class means that I can actually move and take class with my clients. As a student myself, I always admire watching the teacher explore the movements so I could get more of an idea and where I needed to improve. Being more physical also means I’m constantly practicing.

  5. There’s a lot of fun, interesting sequences.

    I also love floor work. It’s a place where you can not only test your strength and balance, but use gravity to prohibit using unnecessary muscles to get through movement. There’s also a lot of hip opening sequences, for example, that that are unlike any other exercise method. The abdominal work is also a beautiful killer.

  6. Your body is the machine.

    When you’ve trained on equipment for a while , the biggest challenge is how to give yourself the same feedback as what the machine gives. Gyrokinesis allows one to create push and pull within the body throughout. It’s wonderfully tough and gives the person a chance for a real breakthrough, physical and mentally.

Come and join me for my GYROKINESIS class from £5 at Tranquility Pilates Centre. Check out the schedule here.

My Favorite GYROKINESIS® Trainers in London:

Allison James

Tranquility Pilates Centre

Saturdays, 11AM

Dylan Elmore

Kings Cross Studios

Wednesdays, 1:15PM & 6PM

Saturdays, 1PM

Elina Patrou

Little Venice Pilates

Wednesdays, 8PM

General Fitness and Well–Being the Gyrotonic Method

Gyrotonic Case Study Recruitment #1

May 12, 2016
gyrotonic case study recruitment

LOOKING FOR PARTICIPANTS WITH
BACK, HIP, AND/OR KNEE PAIN FOR CASE STUDY

Contact Kindall to participate
or visit the Case Study Recruitment Page.

 Back, hip, and knee pain are quite common and could be caused by factors such as Scoliosis, improper rehabilitation, or poor postural alignment. Learn how the GYROTONIC® method can help you decompress the joints, lengthen, realign, and much more.
Certified GYROTONIC® trainers are qualified to deal with common and no-so-common aches and pains developed from genetics, muscular imbalance, post surgery/rehabilitation etc. 1 to 1 training allows the client to learn the necessary skills needed to improve both quickly and efficiently.

Participant Must Haves

  • Commit to 1 to 1 sessions at least once or twice a week for 1-2 months.
  • Have an existing back, hip, and/or knee issue.
  • Already allowed to participate in low to moderate exercise.
  • Have an open mind to a new way of moving, stretching, and strengthening.

Perks!

  • 1 to 1 training for £15
  •  4, 6, or 8-week program tailored to your needs
  • Feedback after each session
  • Weekly progress follow ups via e-mail
  • Exercises to do at home, the office, gym, etc.

What is it for?

To collect information that can be used to continue to inform other trainers, therapists and clinics of how GYROTONIC® exercise can be a part of a client’s rehabilitation routine and, most importantly, how the method works. There is still a general need for more research of the GYROTONIC® method for the general public.

Where will sessions take place and for how long?

gyrotonic case study

1 to 1 sessions will take in my home studio in Homerton, East London. We will have our own space to workout and chat about your needs and concerns.

Sessions run for 1 hour.

Closest station: Homerton

Closest bus stops: 26, 30, 388, 488

Have More Questions?

Feel free to message Kindall about any inquires you may have, or go to the case study recruitment page for more information.

General Fitness and Well–Being Pilates the Gyrotonic Method

What I Learned from ‘Swapping’ Sessions with Other Trainers

April 18, 2016
swapping sessions

As a huge advocate of cross-training and challenging myself to never be comfortable with only practicing one dance technique or exercise method, I’ve always loved the many benefits of doing so. Although difficult at times, it doesn’t take long to see and feel the results. This became especially apparent when I began using the Pilates equipment with Classical Pilates instructor, Maria Baez (who is also my client).

1) No one method is the answer to all types of problems.

Kinespirit, based in New York, succinctly explains the differences and similarities between Pilates and Gyrotonic and how both methods can be a part of anyone’s training. Trainers are often aware that individuals have different needs for their bodies, therefore it’s necessary to educate the client about both methods to help in corporate Pilates or Gyrotonic or both into their routine. This goes for therapies such as Physical Therapy and Osteopathy.

swapping sessions

2) Cross-refer clients.

Cross-referring clients has proven to be successful in the fitness industry around the world. Kona Pilates, based in Hawaii, found that 80% of their clientele train in both Pilates and Gyrotonic. Reform Pilates, based in Oregon, highly support the practice and benefits of both methods and deems Gyrotonic and ‘the perfect companion’ for their clients.

Lisa Maria Goodwin-Rice, one of the 16 Authorised Specialised Gyrotonic Master Trainers wrote great article on ‘How to Introduce the Gyrotonic Method to Pilates Instructors’. These explanations emphasize that both methods require different teaching methods, both of which are just as important. This is another important asset in giving necessary information along to our clients. It’s also useful for trainers and therapists to swap notes and conversations about their clients so we can help each other deal with their problem areas more efficiently. 

swapping sessions

4) Offer cross-training deals.

In an interview with Gyrotonic Master trainer / Pilates Instructor, Angela, and Personal Trainer / Gyrotonic Trainer, Mike Luque, they spoke about the ‘Gyrotonic and Pilates cross-over’. Angela mentions that it’s best to try Gyrotonic without a ‘Pilates brain’ and vice versa. It might be best to not even compare the two.

The only way a client can experience something fully is to practice different methods that are being offered within a studio, says Angela. For example, studios, like Kona Pilates, also offer a ‘cross-over’ program where their clients can utilize training in both Pilates and Gyrotonic as both methods heavily compliment each other. This way we can not only improve business but the client’s well-being. 

Keep (cross) training!

XO

Dance the Gyrotonic Method Tips

Take Home Tips #1: For Dancers

March 1, 2016
journey back to dance #3: mental and physical preparation

Here are a few tips my dance clients receive during and after a GYROTONIC® class that I would like to share.

These tips are essentially all taught during a dance class, however, private and semi-private training allows an individual to focus on the areas that need more improvement to provide even more depth and clarity.

Private or small group training also allows the individual to understand their own body and in their own time. Although these tips and suggestions are a few out of many, it provides an idea of what goes on in a GYROTONIC® class and how it can be beneficial to further improve dance performance.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Maintain a Neutral Pelvis

Often times dancers (well, anyone) tend to have either posterior or anterior tilt in the pelvis, in which they also tend to use during movement. While moving in this way may appear successful, problems and injuries that may occur (i.e. stiff hips and back) is, of course, not very useful to maintain longevity.
A dancer can avoid this common mistake by maintaining a neutral pelvis, especially while standing. This connection can help provide the dancer a great way to practice and ‘preparation’ (the moment before you begin to move).
An example of a pelvis that’s not in neutral is when a dancer is ‘tucking’ or arching in the lower back. So when this happens, when the working leg comes back into a position, the rotation muscles aren’t able to engage properly. When this leg movement is done properly with a neutral pelvis this means that the inner thighs and abdominals get the chance to work.
Therefore, I encourage dancers to practice maintaining a neutral pelvis (and spine) before a class/performance by either doing homework given from the sessions or a few tendus and pliés with the same principle.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Rotate the Whole Leg

Another common sight in dancers is over rotation, of the foot in relation to the rest of the leg. While this may be aesthetically pleasing, this often means that true rotation is not being used. This is especially important in plies and tendus.
Using rotation the of the whole leg is will also help avoid injuries such as knee and ankle problems. In the Gyrotonic hamstring exercises, clients are able to work on proper rotation (both internal and external) lying down which reduces pressure in the spine and allows more freedom in the hip. This way, the body can be more prepared when standing.
During the hamstring exercises, it is reiterated to use energy through the entire leg to rotate from the hip, where the foot and toes will follow. Maintaining this connection will help to engage the appropriate muscles and therefore improve turn out.
I advise my clients to take time before class, especially those with hips problems/ pain, to warm up the turn out muscles by practicing the corrections and homework exercises learned from our sessions. This way the dancer can notice when old habits come back or when the pelvis tends to move unnecessarily as mentioned above.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Shoulders Wide Not Just Down

Dance requires a lot of upper body movement thus, it can be easy to overuse the muscles that surround the shoulder girdle as well as the muscles that are used for rotation.  The aim is to engage the appropriate muscles to support the back especially within movement. Instead reach the shoulders wide not just down. This way, when the arms are moving, the back is engaged and the arms can move more freely.
In addition, a common theme in the Gyrotonic Method are arm movements that lead with the elbow while maintaining a long bend (often the same for leg movements as well), which is very useful for the use of port de bras.
Leading with the back of the arm while maintaining a long bend in the elbow can further aid in the correct use of the shoulder girdle and rotation in the arm. The wider the shoulders, the longer the line, and the more efficient the arms will be when passing through positions quickly (like this amazing example).

take home tips #1: for dancers

Rib Cage Connection

Due to dancers usually being flexible or hyperflexible, I often see a few common alignment deviations. One of them being a lack of rib cage connection standing, sitting, and in movement. Finding and maintaining this connection helps to support the back and maintain balance.
The ‘back support’ that the ribcage connection provides is also important for use of the back of the leg. However, feeling this is a dance class is difficult of course, therefore I often instruct my clients to actually relax the ribs and lengthen the back of the body to then move.
Being too far forward or backward throws the body out of alignment, which makes it difficult to stand, use the legs, and turn. Use the connection of the ribcage as an aid to stand taller, feel the legs, and become aware the the ‘back body’.
Gyrotonic exercises emphasize maintaining a ribcage connection in all planes of movement (i.e. lying down, sitting, standing, rotation). Breathing also helps to find less tension, the proper amount of engagement, length, and expansion.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Not Everything is a Stretch

It can be difficult to resist the temptation to use a pilè or cambré forward as an opportunity to stretch maximally during the beginning of a class, for instance. Warming up allows the body to engage and maintain stability throughout the rest of the class (while reducing the change for injury).
Exercises taught in the beginning of class may require the dancer to already be warm. Otherwise, use the beginning of class as an opportunity to warm up. Additionally, obtaining a ‘long line’ in the body requires both proper alignment and strength to achieve an appropriate range of motion.
The Gyrotonic Method focuses heavily on drawing energy internally to create external movement to then provide the desired length and/or stretch. Thus it’s important not to focus solely on the aesthetic of the movement.

take home tips #1: for dancers

Stay with the Tempo

Timing is often crucial as it helps to make a dancer more musical. This, in turn, can help the dancer fire necessary muscles needed, which allows the dancer to overcome bad habits. Knowing how to stay with the tempo when learning a movement or phrase can further improve personal interpretation of musicality, coordination, and expression.
What makes the Gyrotonic method different from other forms of exercise is how it helps to create long, full movements with different qualities and playful rhythms. Within a Gyrotonic class, different tempos and rhythms are also specifically used to help increase awareness and strength (just liked dance).
It’s important to remember that movement can involve different qualities, textures, and phrasing. Within a Gyrotonic session, clients are allowed to first learn the movement properly while gradually adding the breathe and the rhythm. If movement proves to become difficult to keep up, I ask my clients to ‘check in’ to see what connections/engagements may have been lost.

Taking class and practicing movement is a time for an individual to become more knowledgeable and attuned with the body. Take time to ‘check in’ with what your body needs and how you need to achieve it.

Happy dancing!
xo